pupils at the Museum of London galleries

Our Stories: Reflecting on Black British History in Four Objects

A collection of cross-curricular digital resources

Culture Mile Learning has produced a programme of activity and digital content, to support secondary school teachers to incorporate Black British history, arts, and culture into the curriculum, beginning in October 2020 for Black History Month.

The programme is cross-curricular, with particular relevance for Key Stage 3 English, History, Art, Citizenship and PSHE, and R.E. It centres on four short films, produced collaboratively with Black Londoners, and inspired by objects in our partners’ collections. Teaching prompts and thought provoking discussion questions are provided to inspire creative lesson planning.

We suggest that the films and the accompanying resources are used as fifteen-minute lesson starters. Connected themes include race, migration, colonialism, representation, and resistance.

St Paul's Cathedral

with Victoria Adukwei Bulley and the Eagle Lectern

View the short film of Victoria discussing the eagle lectern, at which Paul Robeson performed in 1958, at St Paul's Cathedral here:

Paul Robeson performing at St Paul's Cathedral in 1958

Use the following links to download PDFs of additional resources that can be used in the classroom, or outside of it:

More information about the Eagle Lectern

Discussion questions about this film

Black History Month teaching prompts for St Paul's Cathedral and Prompt Images

Victoria's poem 'Old Man'

Victoria Adukwei Bulley is a poet, writer and filmmaker. Winner of a 2018 Eric Gregory Award for promising British poets under 30, she has held artist residencies in the USA, Brazil, and the V&A. In 2016, she was shortlisted for the Brunel Prize for African Poetry, and her debut chapbook, Girl B, forms part of the 2017 New-Generation African Poets series. Victoria is the director of MOTHER TONGUES, a poetry, translation and film project exploring the indigenous language heritages of Black and brown poets. She is a doctoral candidate at Royal Holloway, University of London, where she is the recipient of a 2019 Technē scholarship for practice-based research in creative writing.

Guildhall Art Gallery

with Liz Johnson Artur and the photography Top Shelf

View the short film of Liz discussing her artwork at Guildhall Art Gallery here:

Use the following links to download PDFs of additional resources that can be used in the classroom, or outside of it:

More information about the 'Top Shelf' photography

Discussion questions about this film

Black History Month teaching prompts for Guildhall Art Gallery and Prompt Images

Liz Johnson Artur, born in 1964, Bulgaria, lives and works in London. Recent solo-exhibitions include Brooklyn Museum, New York (2019), David Nolan Gallery, New York (2018) and Lothringer 13 Halle, Munich (2016). Recent group exhibitions include Serpentine Gallery, London (2019), 10 Berlin Biennial, Berlin (2018) and Kunstverein Leipzig (2016). Her first UK solo show will be at South London Gallery, 14 June – 1 September 2019. Her monograph with Bierke Verlag was included in the 'Best Photo Books 2016' list of the New York Times.

Museum of London

with Adisa Stephen-Ezeocha and the crochet circle

View the short film of Adisa discussing the crochet circle at the Museum of London here:

Use the following links to download PDFs of additional resources that can be used in the classroom, or outside of it:

Adisa’s MAMMA Poem

More information about the crochet circle

Discussion questions about this film

Black History Month teaching prompts for the Museum of London and Prompt Images

Adisa Stephen-Ezeocha exploded onto the spoken word scene in the summer of 1993, his mango flavoured metaphors and his lava-fuelled performances soon became legendary on the London performance poetry circuit. One year after taking his show on the road, Adisa landed first place in a national competition titled ‘new performance poet of the year’. Benjamin Zephaniah who was one of the judges later said, “Adisa is the future it’s so good to have something to look forward to".

London Metropolitan Archives

with Rebecca Adams and the Mollie Hunte collection

View the short film of Rebecca discussing the Mollie Hunte Collection at London Metropolitan Archives here:

Use the following links to download PDFs of additional resources that can be used in the classroom, or outside of it:

More information about the Mollie Hunte collection

Discussion questions about this film

Black History Month teaching prompts for London Metropolitan Archives and Prompt Images

Rebecca Adams is the project archivist responsible for the Mollie Hunte Collection. She completed an undergraduate degree in English Literature and History from Goldsmiths University in 2016 and went on to complete her Masters in Archives and Records Management at University College London in 2018, graduating in 2019. She is currently working with and organising the records of Mollie Hunte (1932-2015)who was an educational psychologist from Guyana who co-founded several Caribbean advocacy groups for young people and their families.

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