Musicity

Musicity x Culture Mile

Musicity x Culture Mile is a project that encourages a musical and architectural exploration of Culture Mile.

Ten artists have created ten individual new tracks in response to a building, area or aspect of the city that inspires them. The pieces use sound mapping data gathered by acoustic experts ARUP to explore the intrinsic connection between architecture and sound.

All ten of the new tracks have been geo-targeted to the areas they were written in response to, so Culture Mile visitors can truly connect with the music in the places and spaces that inspired them. Bring your headphones, download the map and do the trail.  

More information about the artists involved and the locations included is below.

Visit the Musicity website to access the tracks.

Download the Musicity x Culture Mile map here.

Musicity x Culture Mile is a project that encourages a musical and architectural exploration of Culture Mile.

Ten artists have created ten individual new tracks in response to a building, area or aspect of the city that inspires them. The pieces use sound mapping data gathered by acoustic experts ARUP to explore the intrinsic connection between architecture and sound. Musicity is a site-specific sound/arts practice that invites musicians and recording artists to compose tracks in response to buildings and locations in cities around the world. ARUP SoundsLab is an innovative virtual listening environment that allows clients and designers to hear the sound of existing spaces, and to test and map the sound of designs.

10

artists have created ten individual new tracks

in response to a building, area or aspect of the city that inspires them

600

journeys transformed by digital wayfinding trails

bring your headphones, download the app, do the trail

More highlights

Barbican Centre Sculpture Court

Beneath the curve of Frobisher Crescent is a layer-cake of activity. The top floors consist of residential apartments and Barbican Centre offices. The luckiest teams get a desktop view of the leafy Sculpture Court and its Brutalist, symmetrical staircases.

Beech Street Tunnel

Beech Street forms a ground level route between Barbican tube and Moorgate. A product of the utopian vision of 1960’s planning, it aimed to separate pedestrians above from the traffic below.

Smithfield Rotunda Garden

A pretty, circular park, adjacent to the famous Smithfield Meat Market. A great place to relax and take in the market sites the garden is open from dawn to dusk everyday including weekends.

Barbican Centre Club Stage

Roam its public spaces and discover the beauty of its Brutalist architecture across the centre’s nooks and crannies.

New Museum of London

The composition is inspired by the cavernous, subterranean spaces previously used for keeping goods brought into the market via the railway line underneath, that still ferries Londoners throughout the city today.

Barbican Centre Lakeside

Take in the best views of the surrounding architecture, including St. Giles’ Church and the monolithic Gilbert House, propped up from by gravity defying concrete columns

CityPoint

Citypoint is a 36 storey landmark tower in the City of London. It was one of the original towers in the City, originally built in 1967 with a comprehensive reconstruction in 2001.

Fabric

Fabric first opened in October 1999; though it started as an idea many years prior to that. The building alone took over three years to convert but the club now stands in the renovated space of the Metropolitan Cold Stores in Farringdon.

St Bartholomew the Great

St Bartholomew the Great is London’s oldest parish church, built when Henry I, son of William the Conqueror, was King of England. It survived the Great Fire of 1666 and bombings in both World War I’s Zeppelin raids and during the Blitz in World War II.

The Charterhouse

Opened to the public in 2017, the Charterhouse is both a thriving almshouse and a stunning seven- acre site embracing seven centuries of remarkable lives, lived and lost.